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The PARTY BOYS LIVE at the TIVOLI Sydney 1987 Tape to be released on August 1st

The PARTY BOYS LIVE at the TIVOLI Sydney 1987 Tape to be released on August 1st
BLACK BOX          relief logo        desk tape series logo

The PARTY BOYS


LIVE at the TIVOLI Sydney 1987.

Tape to be released on

August 1st


The PARTY BOYS LIVE at the TIVOLI Sydney 1987 is the 17th release of the Australian Road Crew Association’s (ARCA) Desk Tape Series.

The Party Boys 1000

 The Party Boys are the 17th act to throw their support behind Support Act’s Roadies Fund through the Australian Road Crew Association (ARCA)’s Desk Tape Series.

The Desk Tape Series was created by the Australian Road Crew Association (ARCA) to raise funds to provide financial, health, counselling and well-being services for road crew in crisis.

The recordings are released on ARCA’s Black Box Records through MGM Distribution and on all major streaming services.

Thanx to the TIVOLI for the gigs, Nprint for the cover artwork, Phil “Drac” Dracoulis for the mastering and The PARTY BOYS for supporting roadies and crew. Legends

The live tapes are made straight off the mixing desk and at the TIVOLI the tape was mixed by sound engineer David “Strawb” Quinn.

The Band

John Swan           – singer
Richard Harvey    – drums
Kevin Borich        – guitar
John Brewster     – guitar
Alan Lancaster    – bass
Paul Christie        – bass, drums

The Crew

David ‘Strawb’ Quinn         (sound engineer)
Peter Quinn                         (guitar tech, onstage keyboards contribution)
Clint Braddick                     (guitar tech)
Herman                                (monitor engineer)
Matt Doherty                       (systems engineer)
Michael Richardson           (lighting)
The PARTY BOYS LIVE at the TIVOLI Sydney 1987 live tapes and all the ARCA Desk Tape Series recordings are available through:

https://ffm.to/liveatthetivolisydney1987  (Please paste into browser if it fails to work)

Amazon
Anghami
Apple Music / iTunes
Boomplay
Black Box Records
Deezer
MGM
Pandora
Shazam
Spotify
TenCent
Tidal
TikTok
YouTube Music

To the band’s story….

The Party Boys was formed in 1982 by Mondo Rock bass guitarist Paul Christie along with Australian Crawl’s James Reyne. It played its first show at the Moby Dick Surfer’s Club in Whale Beach, Sydney. The plan was for The Party Boys to be a part-time fun supergroup project playing rock classics, using a revolving door of known musicians when their respective bands were off the road, a total of 36 players over the years.

These included The Angels, Rose Tattoo, Skyhooks, Australian Crawl, The Divinyls, The Models, Dragon and Choirboys, and international names such as Alan Lancaster, Joe Walsh of The Eagles, Eric Burdon of The Animals and Graham Bonnet.

But it became a runaway success, with hit singles and albums, and sell-out concerts.

One of the singles, a cover of John Kongos’ percussive anti-apartheid song from 1971 “He’s Gonna Step On You Again” went to #1 on the ARIA chart.

Originally Paul Christie played bass. But when Alan Lancaster, ex-Status Quo joined, he switched to drums as a two-drummer setup with former Divinyls member Richard Harvey who Paul played his first ever live gig with, this was the line-up that released ‘He’s Gonna Step on You Again’.

The follow up “Hold Your Head Up” from The Party Boys album, was made by the line-up that’s on LIVE at the Tivoli Sydney 1987.

This was the most commercially successful of the line-ups.

The Party Boys was a lucrative experience. Paul Christie was a shrewd businessman and he set up a business model that was ahead of its time in the Australian music industry.

“I took over the band’s management so we didn’t have to pay 20% commission to someone else,” Paul explains.

“In the first week we played, someone left a note outside the singer’s house, ‘If you guys value your arms and legs, you’ll stop this now!’

“We kept the production small, and we really looked after our crew, and they in turn were very loyal.

“We made a lot of money, some of the guys in the band could buy new equipment or cars, or pay off their houses.

“But we worked very, very hard. When the record went to #1, we went from playing four nights a week to six. Just one night off a week! But we became a great band as a result.”

Adds David ‘Strawb’ Quinn, their sound engineer who is responsible for the Tivoli tape, “We were playing to 3,000 people every night, in every Australian state and in New Zealand.

“It was an epic time of my life. I loved the band’s music, they were all on a peak as musicians, and Paul had such a shrewd business brain.

“The crew lived like kings, we earned big money, I never made that kind of money again!”

David Quinn began crewing for his brother Paul’s band Electric Pandas, doing their sound live and on recordings, as a result also offered a job as a tape operator at Rhinoceros Studios and working with the likes of INXS and Cold Chisel.

Aside from doing the sound for the Party Boys, David engineered most of their studio recordings.

The Tivoli show was also the album’s launch party. The venue was packed with fans and music industry executives, and as the tape shows, the crowd was totally vibed up.

It came right in the middle of a tour, so the band was sparking, even as soon as it hit the stage.

The tape includes the two hit singles, as well as La De Das’ “Gonna See My Baby Tonight”, The Angels’ “Fashion And Fame” and “Marseilles” and Status Quo’s “Roll Over Lay Down” and “Rockin’ All Over The World”. Others were Them’s “Gloria”, The Doors’ “Roadhouse Blues” and AC/DC’s “Live Wire” and “High Voltage”.

Introducing the latter song, Swanee says, “No one ever had an effect on me as much as Bon Scott, he’s my hero!”

AC/DC invited the Party Boys to tour Australia with them in 1988, and treated them royally.

The Party Boys missed out on creating two great line-ups.

After an Adelaide show with Joe Walsh, the guitarist asked Paul to come up to his room to say he’d gotten the next line-up worked out.

Joe Walsh was on an international call to someone called Stuart. Joe handed the phone over to Paul Christie. After some casual chit-chat, Paul asked the mysterious caller what he played.

“I play the drums, man”, came the reply in an American accent.

With anyone I know?”

“Oh I play with these two English assholes in a band called The Police,” chuckled Stu Copeland.

The idea was for the line-up to include Steve Winwood. At the last moment Winwood’s record company wanted him to stay in America and record a new album and the idea was dropped.

Another time, Paul met with highly influential US guitar hero Stevie Ray Vaughan in Sydney and Vaughan was keen to return to Australia to play with The Party Boys.

“I just have to go back to America and play a show with Eric Clapton in Wisconsin, and then we’ll talk”.

But after that show (August 1990) while leaving the show in a helicopter, it crashed on the side of a snow hill and the 35-year old Stevie was killed.

The Party Boys broke up in 1992, although they would reunite a number of times.
 
 ARCA would like to thank the following sponsors of The Desk Tape Series:-

Sponsor                 Industry Roles
Showtech                Rigging                            
CMI                         P.A and Production                      
Clearlight                Lighting                                     
DSE Trucks            Transport                                   
Scully Outdoors       Outdoor Production           
Gigpower                 Crewing and Staging                             
Lock and Load         Crewing                           
Chameleon Touring  Production and Lighting                         
JPJ                          P.A and Lighting                                             
Novatech                 P.A and Lighting     
Phaseshift               Lighting                                     
Show FX Australia    Pyrotechnics                     
Event Personnel Australia   Crewing                           
Norwest                  P.A and Lighting Production
Nprint                     Artwork
               
Ian Peel and Adrian Anderson
ARCA Co-founders and Directors.

Note from founders:-

"ARCA and The Desk Tape Series is a small way we can help our mates get some self-worth and recognition for their contribution to the Aussie music industry and help if they are in crisis. It is a great honor for us to be able to present these memories to all."

All Hail Roadies and Crew

"Looking after OUR OWN with FEELING and a WHOLE LOTTA LOVE"

All enquiries contact :

          Adrian Anderson     0409 789 440
          Ian Peel            0415 667 221
Continue reading

DAVE TICE and The Headhunters LIVE at Yella Rock 1991 Tape to be dropped July 1st

DAVE TICE and The Headhunters LIVE at Yella Rock 1991 Tape to be dropped July 1st
BLACK BOX          relief logo        desk tape series logo

DAVE TICE

and The Headhunters

LIVE at Yella Rock 1991.

Tape to be dropped July 1st.

Dave Tice and The Headhunters LIVE at Yella Rock 1991is the 16th release of the Australian Road Crew Association’s (ARCA) Desk Tape Series.


Dave Tice and the Headhunters 1500

Dave Tice And The Headhunters are the 16th act to throw their support behind Support Act’s Roadies Fund through the Australian Road Crew Association (ARCA)’s Desk Tape Series.

The successful ARCA Desk Tape Series was created by ARCA to raise funds and resources for Support Act’s Roadies Fund to provide financial, health, counselling and well being services for roadies and crew in crisis.

The tapes are released on ARCA’s Black Box Records through MGM Distribution and on all major streaming services.

Thanks to Nprint for the cover artwork, Ernie Rose for doing the DAT tape transfer, the tribe of headhunters in New Guinea for not eating the photographer who took the cover photo, Phil Dracoulis for the mastering and Dave Tice and The Headhunters for supporting roadies and crew.

The live tapes are usually made straight off the mixing desk and in this case it was by sound engineer Grahame "Yogi" Harrison.

The Dave Tice and The Headhunters LIVE at Yella Rock 1991 live tapes and all the ARCA Desk Tape Series recordings are available through:

https://ffm.to/liveatyellarock1991  (Please paste into browser if it fails to work)

Amazon
Anghami
Apple Music / iTunes
Boomplay
Black Box Records
Deezer
MGM
Pandora
Shazam
Spotify
TenCent
Tidal
TikTok
YouTube Music

LIVE At Yella Rock 1991 was recorded on a private farm in Yellow Rock, a town an hour’s drive from Sydney, 

Dave Tice and The Headhunters band:
            Dave Tice: vocal, harmonica, rhythm guitar
            Steve Edmonds: lead guitar
            Paul Balbi: drums
            John Carlini: bass

Road Crew:
            Mark Gibson
            Phillip “Drac” Draculis

Live Tape Sound Engineer:
            Grahame “Yogi” Harrison

“I’ve heard this Headhunters tape quite a few times, and it surprises me because we are so full of energy,” recalls singer Dave Tice.

“So much so that backstage after performing, I was speaking to a couple of people, and I actually fell asleep standing up!

“I don’t like standing in the audience, I don’t even like crowds. But my approach to a gig is you create a community for a time, and that comprises of the people in the audience and the people on stage. There’s no divide. It’s like when people got around the campfire and danced to the sound of the drums. We’re all part of it.”

The set reflected the blues and R&B that Tice helping to spearhead in Australia from the ‘60s.

The audience was transported from the swamp rock of Creedence’s “Green River/ Run To The Jungle” and Latino blues of Los Lobos’ “Don't Worry Baby, It's Gonna Be Alright” to the slow burning “Slow” by Lonnie Mack to sturdy workouts as “One's Too Many”, Muddy Waters “Hoochie Coochie Man” and “Boom Boom, Out Go The Lights” and the encore, a grittier rendition of UK outfit Johnny Kidd & the Pirates.

A highlight was an eight minute frantic rendition of "Baby, Please Don't Go", first popularised in the 1930s by Delta bluesman Big Joe Williams.

The tape nails why Dave Tice and The Headhunters became so popular.

When Dave returned in 1984 from the UK where he was frontman for R&B/punk Count Bishops, he formed the band with Rose Tattoo’s Mick Cocks and former AC/DC bassist Mark Evans. They all had other commitments, and The Headhunters operated as a revolving lineup as various members went off to do other stints.

The lineup on LIVE At Yella Rock 1991 had only played two or three times together, which made their tightness even more remarkable.

"Baby, Please Don't Go” showcased the Headhunter solo skills – guitarist Steve Edmonds displaying why he was being hailed a virtuoso, Paul Balbi kicking off with a steady drum pattern, John Carlini’s solo going higher than what a bass guitar was built for, and Tice driving things along with a harmonica solo.

“It’s not a bad feel is it … I LIKE that feel” he’s heard telling the appreciative audience

 download     download 1

Dave Tice met the blues in his early teens. Born on Christmas Day in 1950 in London, he grew up in a farm with no TV or even electricity.

He was visiting a friend whose family had a TV set, and watching a show called Ready Steady Go. On came a fierce looking uninhibited band with long hair and skinny legs. They were The Rolling Stones and they triggered in Dave a long time love for the blues.

At 14, Dave and his family moved to Brisbane. At the migrants’ hostel he hung with black African teenagers equally as passionate over the blues.

But meeting Pete Wells changed his performing career. They played in a number of bands before moving to Sydney where they became Buffalo.

In Buffalo Dave perfected his approach to performing – to be as ‘on edge’ as possible. Booking agents hated they were loud and brutal. But without radio airplay, their albums went gold in Australia and found a following in Europe.

LIVE At Yella Rock 1991 features a cover of Chain’s “Snatch It Back And Hold It”. Tice loved the Melbourne band. When the singer relocated to the UK in 1977 after Buffalo split, Towards The Blues was one of three albums he took.

During this time Dave Tice flexed his muscles as a songwriter, writing with Doctor Feelgood’s Johnny “Guitar” Crippen and Dennis Walker of the Robert Cray Band. LIVE At Yella Rock 1991 features a number of his songs: “Louise” written with Australian guitarist Mal Eastick, the boogie “On The Prowl” and riff-laden “Cadillac Walk”.

The Yella/Yellow Rock show was an emotional reunion for legendary crew figure Grahame “Yogi” Harrison. He’d worked with Dave Tice and Paul Balbi in Buffalo when he was paid $5 a gig. He’d gone on to crew for Rose Tattoo, Air Supply (“I love mixing vocals, they were wonderful musicians), Jon English, The Sunnyboys, The Johnnys and The Saints, with whom he went to the UK.

“I was amazed at how far in front of England we were, in very way… even sound equipment, they were so far behind.”

Grahame once went into the offices of EMI with his cassette bag and played them LRB, Air Supply, Dragon and AC/DC. The execs said they had no potential. Most of these acts went on to sell millions of records.

His memory of the LIVE At Yella Rock 1991 show: “I was looking forward to seeing Dave and Paul again, and I had the joy of seeing that guitar virtuoso Steve.

“The crowd was made up of partying bikies with close friends and associates. There was copious amount of alcohol and chemicals and they were quite happy to share it with everybody including us. It was a wonderful environment!”

ARCA would like to thank the following sponsors of The Desk Tape Series:-

Sponsor                 Industry Roles
Showtech                Rigging                            
CMI                         P.A and Production                      
Clearlight                Lighting                                     
DSE Trucks            Transport                                   
Scully Outdoors       Outdoor Production           
Gigpower                 Crewing and Staging                             
Lock and Load         Crewing                           
Chameleon Touring  Production and Lighting                         
JPJ                          P.A and Lighting                                             
Novatech                 P.A and Lighting     
Phaseshift               Lighting                                     
Show FX Australia    Pyrotechnics                     
Event Personnel Australia   Crewing                           
Norwest                  P.A and Lighting Production
Nprint                     Artwork
               
Ian Peel and Adrian Anderson
ARCA Co-founders and Directors.

Note from founders:-

"ARCA and The Desk Tape Series is a small way we can help our mates get some self-worth and recognition for their contribution to the Aussie music industry and help if they are in crisis. It is a great honor for us to be able to present these memories to all."

All Hail Roadies and Crew

"Looking after OUR OWN with FEELING and a WHOLE LOTTA LOVE"

All enquiries contact :

          Adrian Anderson     0409 789 440
          Ian Peel            0415 667 221
Continue reading

Albert Lee and Vince Gill with Aussie friends LIVE at The Prince of Wales Hotel 1988 Tape to be dropped June 1st.

Albert  Lee and Vince Gill

with Aussie friends

LIVE at The Prince of Wales Hotel 1988

Tape to be dropped June 1st.
BLACK BOX          relief logo        desk tape series logo

Albert  Lee and Vince Gill

with Aussie friends

LIVE at The Prince of Wales Hotel 1988

Tape to be dropped June 1st.

Albert Lee and Vince Gill, with Aussie friends, LIVE at The Prince Of Wales Hotel, 1988 is the 15th release of the Australian Road Crew Association’s (ARCA) Desk Tape Series.

Albert and Vince 1500

Highly acclaimed US-based country music guitarists Vince Gill and Albert Lee are the latest artists to throw their support behind ARCA’s Desk Tape Series.

The live show at The Prince of Wales Hotel Bandroom in St Kilda, Melbourne in 1988 was part of a 10-date run, which included a run of shows at The Prince of Wales Hotel. The backing band was comprised of two legendary Aussies, Malcolm Wakeford on drums and Graham Thompson on bass.

The live tapes are made straight off the mixing desk and made by a road crew member, in this case it was the sound engineer for the tour, another great Aussie, Noel Bennett.

This is the latest in the Desk Tape Series, created by the Australian Road Crew Association (ARCA) to raise funds to provide financial, health, counselling and well being services for roadies and crew in crisis.

They are released on ARCA’s Black Box Records, through MGM Distribution and on all major streaming services.

Thanx to Nprint for the artwork, Phil Dracoulis for the mastering, and Albert Lee and Vince Gill, and the Aussie band, for their support of roadies and crew. Awesome.

The Albert Lee and Vince Gill with Aussie friends, LIVE at The Prince of Wales Hotel 1988 tape, and all the ARCA Desk Tape Series live recordings are available through:

 https://ffm.to/liveattheprinceofwaleshotel1988   (Please paste into browser if it fails to work)

Amazon
Anghami
Apple Music / iTunes
Boomplay
Black Box Records
Deezer
MGM
Pandora
Shazam
Spotify
TenCent
Tidal
TikTok
YouTube Music

Now a country music superstar, winner of 22-Grammys and who last toured Australia as part of The Eagles, Vince Gill was still establishing his solo career when the Australian tour took place.

Now based in Nashville, he knew Albert Lee when they were both living in Los Angeles and moving around in the same music circles.

On Live at The Prince of Wales Hotel, 1988, Vince can be heard laughingly telling the audience, “I was the only one in the US stupid enough to play after Albert Lee!”

Thirty three years later, Vince exclaims, “That’s still true! No one plays like Albert. He has a swing and a bounce, and so intoxicating to play with.

“There’s absolutely no competition when we play together, just total admiration.”

In 1988, Albert Lee enjoyed legend status among other musicians.

Born in England, he was “the guitarist’s guitarist”, for his technical virtuosity and for playing his Telecaster at breakneck speed.

This was the time of squealing feedback courtesy Jimi Hendrix, Jimmy Page and Eric Clapton. Lee wanted to play country music and thought he’d try his luck in Los Angeles in 1974. He was embraced there, recording and touring with heaps of musicians, notably with the Everly Brothers and Emmylou Harris.

“We were the youngsters who picked up the mantle after the great country names like Buck Owens and Merle Haggard,” Albert recalls.

“That’s when I first met Vince. He was more into bluegrass. But he and Ricky Skaggs would tell you I was an influence on them picking up the guitar.”

Listening to Live at The Prince of Wales, 1988 brought back memories.

 “I wasn’t nervous about hearing those old tapes because I knew we played well,” Albert says. “But we wanted to do this for ARCA’s Roadie Fund. Being a crew member is tough and there’s no pension, so it’s all I could do to help.

“I don’t think there’s a fund like ARCA’s in America, not that I’ve heard of. But I do know musicians are doing charity shows for crews.”

Vince put the spotlight on the relationship between musicians and crews.

“The sound, the lights, everything’s done for you. So many guys who do that are musicians themselves. Maybe they never made it up to that level of musicianship or singing but they love being around people who love the same things.

“It’s been a crazy 12 to 18 months and it’s apparent everybody is struggling. Everyone’s in the same boat, and there are a lot of good people doing things like this to give a hand up.”

On Live At The Prince Of Wales, 1988, the mood is both laid-back yet intense, the crowd cheering them along as they exchange licks, harmonies and affectionate stage patter.

ALBERT LEE2 307 gallery  Vince Gill1

Albert Lee                                        Vince Gill

The set included Lee’s “Evangelina”, ”So Sad” and cover of John Hiatt’s “Pink Bedroom” while Gill contributed “Colder Than Winter” and “Just Enough To Keep Me Hanging On”.

Because of time constraints in rehearsing with their Australian backup band, much of the second part of the set was filled with uptempo rockabilly classics as “One Way Rider” and “Tear It Up”.

“Sweet Little Lisa”, which Albert Lee had recorded with Dave Edmunds, saw the duo joined on the night by Stephen Housden of Little River Band. They knew him from LRB’s American tours, and had dinner with him before the show. Also at the meal was Russell Morris, whom they knew when he lived in the US. Morris was in the audience that night but didn’t join them on stage.

The classics “That’s Alright Mama” and “Mystery Train”, popularised by Elvis Presley, were more a tribute to the King’s guitarist Scotty Moore.

Vince: “We grew up listening to things like ‘Mystery Train’ and ‘That’s Alright Mama’, we were all influenced by Scotty Moore.

 “Those were some of the earliest things we heard, a bit of rock, a bit of rockabilly, a little bit of country twang, those songs were perfect and timeless.”

Albert: “I still do some of those classics in my set. I rest them but they always keep coming back!

“I really admired Scotty, he was one of my earliest heroes. I met him when we played at a big concert at Abbey Road Studios in London.

“Sad to say I never had the time to sit down and talk. He was pretty shy. I’d love to have picked his brain on a number of things. I had his phone number but sadly I didn’t take the chance to call.”

The 1988 tour was pulled together by folk music promoter and wine grower Andrew Pattison. In 1973, he and a friend drove in an old London taxi from England through Europe and Asia and ended up in Australia where he ran the Troubadour club in Melbourne

Pattison, who donated the live tape to ARCA, originally planned for the tour to include Rodney Crowell but the schedules clashed.

“The tour with Vince and Albert was the most enjoyable I’d ever done. They were so down-to-earth and of course great musicians. They stayed at my home, and my wife washed their clothes.”

He recalls taking them to a birthday party at a friends who also ran a winery, in Hanging Rock.

Neither were household names at the time, but one of the guests realised Vince was a top golfer, “a scratch golfer” who had no handicap.

“Why didn’t you become a professional golfer?” she asked.

Vince replied in his typical matter-of-fact style, “Because I can sing better!”

ARCA would like to thank the following sponsors of The Desk Tape Series:-

Sponsor                  Industry Roles
Showtech                 Rigging                             
CMI                          P.A and Production                       
Clearlight                  Lighting                                       
DSE Trucks              Transport                                     
Scully Outdoors        Outdoor Production            
Gigpower                 Crewing and Staging                    
Lock and Load          Crewing                            
Chameleon Touring   Production and Lighting                          
JPJ                           P.A and Lighting                                               
Novatech                 P.A and Lighting      
Phaseshift                Lighting                                       
Show FX Australia    Pyrotechnics                      
Event Personnel Australia       Crewing                            
Norwest                   P.A and Lighting Production
Nprint                      Artwork

Ian Peel and Adrian Anderson
ARCA Co-founders and Directors.

Note from founders:-

"ARCA and The Desk Tape Series is a small way we can help our mates get some self-worth and recognition for their contribution to the Aussie music industry and help if they are in crisis. It is a great honor for us to be able to present these memories to all."

All Hail Roadies and Crew

"Looking after OUR OWN with FEELING and a WHOLE LOTTA LOVE

All enquiries contact :

          Adrian Anderson      0409 789 440
          Ian Peel            0415 667 221
Continue reading

Wendy Matthews LIVE at Mudgee RSL 1991 and Bunnemah Estate 1994

Wendy Matthews LIVE at Mudgee RSL 1991 and Bunnemah Estate 1994
BLACK BOX            relief logo         desk tape series logo
 
Wendy Matthews


LIVE at Mudgee RSL 1991 and Bunnemah Estate 1994 tape to be dropped 1st May

Wendy Matthews LIVE at Mudgee RSL 1991 and Bunnemah Estate 1994 is the 14th release of the Australian Road Crew Association (ARCA) Desk Tape Series.

Wendy Matthews 1500

The successful ARCA Desk Tape Series was created by ARCA to raise funds and resources for Support Act’s Roadies Fund to provide financial, health, counselling and well being services for roadies and crew in crisis.

The tapes are released on ARCA’s Black Box Records through MGM Distribution and on all major streaming services.

Thanks to Wendy Matthews for the photos, Nprint for the cover artwork, Phil Dracoulis for the mastering and Wendy Matthews for supporting roadies and crew.

Wendy Matthews is the 14th artist to throw her support behind ARCA's Desk Tape Series which provides assistant funding for Support Act’s Roadies Fund. Wendy donated two tapes from the era when she made the transition from highly-respected backup singer to multi-platinum solo artist.

The live tapes are made straight off the mixing desk and made by a road crew member, in this case her sound engineer Jim Blackfoot.

The Wendy Matthews LIVE at Mudgee RSL 1991 and Bunnemah Estate 1994 live tapes and all the ARCA Desk Tape Series recordings are available through:

https://ffm.to/wendymatthewslive   (Please paste into browser if it fails to work)

Amazon
Anghami
Apple Music / iTunes
Boomplay
Black Box Records
Deezer
MGM
Pandora
Shazam
Spotify
TenCent
Tidal
TikTok
YouTube Music

The first show was at the Mudgee RSL (NSW) in April 1991, a year after her debut album Émigré went platinum and won her ARIA awards for best female singer and best newcomer (single).

Her hit singles included ‘Token Angels’ (inspired by a tragic school bus crash in Grafton,NSW), ‘Woman's Gotta Have It’ and ‘Let's Kiss (Like Angels Do)’.

It was one of the first shows her band did after just three weeks of rehearsals. Already they were red-hot, quickly adapting to Wendy’s mix of soulful ballads and funk-jazz slammers.

By the time of the second tape, recorded three years later at Bunnamah Estate in Margaret River (WA), she had international tours under her belt, and her stage confidence had soared.

The second album Lily, which reached #2 and certified triple platinum, yielded more hits as

‘The Day You Went Away’, ‘Friday's Child’ and ‘If Only I Could’ and even led to her making her acting debut as a nightclub singer in the 1993 movie Flynn about actor Errol Flynn.

“It was a very prolific time for me, very creative and magical,” Wendy recalls that era. “But it was a bit nerve-wracking because I wasn’t prepared, as a human being and as a dreamer.

“I was used to being in the back line, singing backing vocals as my chosen profession, and it took me a long time to feel more relaxed out in front. So I was still figuring out who and what I was.

“But listening to it now, I seem to have had a strong idea of what I wanted to do musically and what I wanted to say.

“I do marvel at that young voice, I remember in those days thinking I wish I had more depth, age and soul in my voice. Now that I have that depth, age and soul, I’m thinking ‘wow, listen to that clear young high voice.”

Wendy Matthews Live 1991/1994

13/4/91 Mudgee RSL
Band
Mick King              Guitar
Paul Abrahams      Bass
Mark Meyer           Drums
Amanda Brown      Violin, oboe, acoustic guitar
Mark O’Connor      Keyboards

Crew
Jim Blackfoot         FOH sound
Davros                   Monitors
Simon Smithers     FOH rigger
Adam Zak              Lights
Yan Jamieson        Stage
Adam Burbury       Stage
Pat Pickett             Truck driver

1994 Bunnamah Estate, Margaret River, WA
Band
Mick King               Guitar
Chris Sweeney      Drums
Ron Francois         Bass
Amanda Brown      Violin, oboe, acoustic guitar
Mark O’Connor      Keyboards
Lisa Maxwell          Backing vocals

Crew
Jim Blackfoot
Charlie Zarb
Yan Jamison
Davros
Adam Burbury
Adam Zak
Simon Smithers

Many of the band and crew are still with her today. Jim Blackfoot, her front-of-house and tour manager for five years – who recorded Wendy Matthews Live 1991/1994 – remembers how the singer ran her touring party as a family.

“She was absolutely lovely, she was like a mother hen, concerned about every single person in the tour party that they were OK.

“Onstage she has a great time. Off stage, she never complained. In fact she couldn’t get to sleep after a show, so she and guitarist Mick King would come into my room when I was doing the post-show finances and serenade me until 3 in the morning!”

Wendy Mathews and her songs celebrate being a free spirit and outsider and lover of nature. She’s been these all her life.

 Wendy Matthews1      d072bc19c41729900b8527a8f8c5070f

Born in Montreal, Canada, her art school parents split when she was 14. Two years later she left school and went busking across North America with friends.

At 18 she was in Los Angeles busking, making jewellery and working as a session singer.

She did backup vocals on Little River Band co-founder Glenn Shorrock’s solo album, and he invited her back to Australia to sing on tour.

She stayed, singing backup on albums by Jimmy Barnes, Richard Clapton, Tim Finn, Icehouse and Cher, and joining bands as The Models and The Rockmelons (where she first started working with Jim Blackfoot) and Peter Blakeley and The Resurrection.

In 1989 she was part of the supergroup Absent Friends, which included members of INXS and The Models, who had a Top 5 hit with ‘I Don't Wanna Be With Nobody But You’ (which is also on the ARCA live tapes) before going solo.

The nature of her relationship with her audience came from her childhood idol Joni Mitchell.

The legendary fellow Canadian said in interviews it was important for her fans to see themselves, and not her, in her songs and that how they responded was uniquely theirs and made them understand themselves better.

“I’ve kept that quote with me for years,” admits Wendy. “If you think a song is totally about me, and if you don’t see yourself in its lyrics, you’ve missed the point entirely. It’s about us all.

“People come to my shows not to headbang or jump in the moshpit or drop acid, but they dance, and they form conga lines. And if they start crying, which often happens, then I’m so honoured because they’re cleansing and expressing their inner relationship with the song.

“As that old quote goes, some people will love you and some people will hate you, and nothing of it has anything to do with you. It’s entirely their own reference in life. That’s a beautiful thing, and I feel honoured to be a catalyst in that.”

She has lived for the past 20 years on a 10-acre spread on a mountain top outside Coffs Harbour on the NSW in a mud-brick house. Her only companion is her six month half border collie half kelpie Odo, whom she got after her long time border collie companion Bear moved into her next universe.

Wendy is bemused by how strangers she meets insist that she lives in a teepee, is vegetarian, abstains from alcohol and meditates every day. It isn’t the case but she doesn’t worry: “they project on to people they don’t know but have accessed through lyrics or photos.

Wendy is currently writing her next album, to release through her own Barking Bear record label.

Two people in her life intensified Wendy’s living her life according to her own rules.

One is her mother, another free spirit, a one time art student who taught special needs children and, now at age 89, conducts eight classes of yoga a week.

The other is late US modernistic painter Georgia O’Keeffe, who left her husband and New York City to live in the desert by herself in a once-abandoned hacienda in Abiquiú, painting the New Mexico landscape and animal skulls.

Wendy who still has a photo of O’Keeffe on her table for inspiration, and who made regular pilgrimages to her home and museum, wrote the song ‘Georgia’s Song’ which is also on the tapes.

“In the song I tried to convey her love of the desert and her single-mindedness (she had trouble being a wife in the city of New York, which I could relate to), her independence, her strengths, and how you can be different from the crowd and still be inspiring to many others.

“I live very remotely up in the mountains and I couldn’t care less what people think of me. I’ve taken aspects of her life and made them my own.”

ARCA would like to thank the following sponsors of The Desk Tape Series:-

Sponsor                 Industry Roles
Showtech                Rigging                            
CMI                         P.A and Production                      
Clearlight                Lighting                                     
DSE Trucks            Transport                                   
Scully Outdoors      Outdoor Production           
Gigpower                Crewing and Staging                             
Lock and Load        Crewing                           
Chameleon Touring  Production and Lighting                         
JPJ                          P.A and Lighting                                             
Novatech                 P.A and Lighting     
Phaseshift               Lighting                                     
Show FX Australia   Pyrotechnics                     
Event Personnel Australia   Crewing                           
Norwest                  P.A and Lighting Production
Nprint                     Artwork

Ian Peel and Adrian Anderson
ARCA Co-founders and Directors.

Note from founders:-
"ARCA and The Desk Tape Series is a small way we can help our mates get some self-worth and recognition for their contribution to the Aussie music industry and help if they are in crisis. It is a great honor for us to be able to present these memories to all."

All Hail Roadies and Crew

"Looking after OUR OWN with FEELING and a WHOLE LOTTA LOVE"
 

All enquiries contact :

          Adrian Anderson     0409 789 440
          Ian Peel            0415 667 221
Continue reading

RUSSELL MORRIS and the RUBES LIVE at the PALLADIUM 1982

RUSSELL MORRIS and the RUBES LIVE at the PALLADIUM 1982

BLACK BOX     relief logo     desk tape series logo 


RUSSELL

MORRIS

and the RUBES

LIVE at the PALLADIUM 1982

TAPE TO BE DROPPED 1st March.

Russell Morris and the Rubes LIVE at the Palladium 1982, is the 13th release of the Australian Road Crew Association’s (ARCA) Desk Tape Series.
 
Russell Morris 1500
 
The successful ARCA Desk Tape Series was created by ARCA to raise funds and resources for Support Act’s Roadies Fund to provide financial, health, counselling and well being services for roadies and crew in crisis.

The tapes are released on ARCA’s Black Box Records through MGM Distribution and on all major streaming services.

Thanks to Greg Noakes for the photos, Nprint for the cover artwork, Phil Dracoulis for the mastering and Russell Morris and the Rubes for supporting roadies and crew.

The live tapes are made straight off the mixing desk and made by a road crew member, in this case their sound engineer Mark "Ramjet" Williams, who did the sound for the band for 12 months.

The Russell Morris and the Rubes LIVE at the Palladium, 1982 tape and all the ARCA Desk Tape Series recordings are available through:

https://ffm.to/liveatthepalladium1982     (Please paste into browser if it fails to work)

Amazon
Anghami
Apple Music / iTunes
Boomplay
Deezer
MGM
Pandora
Shazam
Spotify
TenCent
Tidal
TikTok
YouTube Music
 

The Crew:
Mark Williams (sound engineer)

The Band:
Russell Morris          (vocals, guitar)
Bruce Haymes         (keyboards)
Max Chazan             (guitars)
Spiro Philipas           (bass) (R.I.P)
Rick Puchala            (drums)

The Rubes were formed in 1980 as a vehicle for Russell Morris’ songwriting after he returned to Australia after a lengthy stay in the US.

His early hits like ‘Hush’, ‘The Real Thing Pts. 1, 2 & 3’ and ‘Rachel’ were written by others but he wanted to concentrate on his own work.

“Being a pop star was a wonderful place to be, until I realised I had painted myself into a corner and I lost control of my life,” he admits.

“I decided to sink or swim, and I needed to sing my own songs to have a ring of truth.”

The self-penned ‘Wings of An Eagle’, ‘Sweet Sweet Love’ and ‘Mr America’ continued his run of hits.

‘Wings of An Eagle’ was inspired by Morris’ love for ancient mythology, and how First Australians, Native Americans and early Romans believed an eagle took the spirits of the dead to the heavens.

‘Sweet Sweet Love’ was made up of two songs, inspired by a photo of his then-wife which he stuck up on the wall of a freezing bedsit in London while trying for UK success.

The Rubes formed in 1980 from the ashes of The Russell Morris Band, who imploded through personality clashes between some members.

hqdefault Russell and the Rubes

The new line-up included Bruce Haymes and Max Chazan.  They’d been in a band called The Rubes, so the name was kept. 

The Rubes’ set centred on interplay between Haymes' keyboards and Chazan’s guitars, and did wonders for Morris’ newer songs as ‘Roar Of The Wild Torpedoes’, ‘Surprise Surprise’, ‘Thunderground’, ‘In The Heat Of The Night’ and ‘One Way Street’, all featured on Live At The Palladium.

The set also included hits as ‘Hush’, ‘Eagle’ and a gritty ‘Mr. America’ and album tracks as ‘So Tough’, ‘Love Stealer’ and ‘How We Run’.

Morris says, “They were really good players. What struck me when I heard Live At The Melbourne Palladium was how fast we were playing.

“Those were the times I guess, you had to go rat-tat-tat to get people jumping up and down!”

The Rubes’ music got critical acclaim but mainstream radio refused to play their tracks as they considered Morris – and many of his contemporaries – “old hat”.

Morris says, “I was writing a fair bit. I’ve always written. But unfortunately I was desperate to get The Rubes up and running with some big hit albums, so we could cut back on the roadwork and not get overexposed and I could pay the guys the same amount of money.

“But many writers fall into the trap of looking at what is happening, and you try and chase it.  It’s like trying to catch a boat that’s already left the port. I call it chasing the pied piper.”

However ‘The Roar Of The Wild Torpedoes’ still remains in his current set, and fans who recently discovered Morris through his blues/roots renaissance have hunted down these songs.

By 1983 the five Rubes made a decision: if their single ‘Get It Right’, which they rated highly, wasn’t picked up by radio, they’d call it quits.

Morris remembers The Rubes with great affection.

“Every night during the encore of ‘The Real Thing’ I’d leap on Bruce’s back and play guitar. It was only later that I discovered he had a chronic back problem, and that he wore braces and had to have exercises every day because of it.

“I said to him, why didn’t you tell me, I could have done serious damage to your back. He said, It was part of the show and you looked like you were enjoying yourself’. He’s a lovely man and I adored being with him.

“He was a geophysicist, highly intelligent, who could have made a fortune working for a mining company. But being an environmentalist and a highly principled man, he declined that route.”

Haymes went on to play with Bachelors from Prague and Paul Kelly, and won an ARIA for soundtrack for the feature film Lantana (2001).

Chazan, an economic graduate, made a fortune on the stock market. Puchala went on to work for a trucking company. Philipas died in the 1990s.

What followed was a tough period when the music work dried up. It was a stressful time during which time a marriage broke up. He tried music theatre (Jesus Christ Superstar) and wrote jingles (Island Cooler, the Australian Diamond Company) and teamed up on retro-acts as (Ronnie) Burns (Daryl) Cotton & Morris and Cotton (Jim) Keays & Morris.

These were financially rewarding, but not artistically.  “I thought, no one is interested in my trying to hits, I should just write for myself.

“It was a question of just thinking of what got me into music. The first Rolling Stones album, Robert Johnson, John Lee Hooker, Howlin’ Wolf, Bob Dylan, go back to writing simple songs.”

One day he saw a faded newspaper photo of the criminal Thomas Archer, which virtually spoke to him, “Write a song about me.” It struck a chord and he started writing of real-life Australian characters, locations and experiences.

“It was a real accident but it brought me back out of the wilderness.”

The 2012—2015 trilogy Sharkmouth, Van Diemen's Land and Red Dirt – Red Heart saw him back in the charts and in demand for gigs. He followed up with more successful albums.

People suddenly remembered his songwriting and singing prowess, and Russell Morris went on to be inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame and Australian Songwriters Hall of Fame and in 2018 given the Order of Australia medal for his services to music.

ARCA would like to thank the following sponsors of The Desk Tape Series:-

Sponsor                 Industry Roles
Showtech                Rigging                            
CMI                         P.A and Production                      
Clearlight                 Lighting                                     
DSE Trucks             Transport                                   
Scully Outdoors       Outdoor Production           
Gigpower                 Crewing and Staging                             
Lock and Load         Crewing                           
Chameleon Touring  Production and Lighting                         
JPJ                          P.A and Lighting                                             
Novatech                 P.A and Lighting     
Phaseshift               Lighting                                     
Show FX Australia   Pyrotechnics                     
Event Personnel Australia   Crewing                           
Norwest                  P.A and Lighting Production
Nprint                     Artwork

Ian Peel and Adrian Anderson
ARCA Co-founders and Directors.

Note from founders:-

"ARCA and The Desk Tape Series is a small way we can help our mates get some self-worth and recognition for their contribution to the Aussie music industry and help if they are in crisis. It is a great honor for us to be able to present these memories to all."

All Hail Roadies and Crew

"Looking after OUR OWN with FEELING and a WHOLE LOTTA LOVE"

All enquiries contact :

          Adrian Anderson     0409 789 440
          Ian Peel            0415 667 221

Continue reading